How to Treat Your Vertigo Naturally with Chinese Medicine

how to treat vertigo naturally with TCM

How to Treat Your Vertigo Naturally with Traditional Chinese Medicine.

 

Do you feel the world is spinning around? If you do, there’s a high chance that you are experiencing vertigo.

 

If you are suffering from the symptom or wish to prevent it, this post is for you.

 

What’s Vertigo in Traditional Chinese Medicine?

Vertigo is the most common problem in adults. A study of the University of California San Francisco shows about 40% of U.S adults experience vertigo at least once in their lifetime. So if you experience one, that’s not surprising at all. The degree and type of vertigo vary from person to person: some suffer from peripheral(spinning) vertigo and some suffer from central vertigo.

From the perspective of traditional Chinese medicine, there are several root causes of vertigo such as dysfunction of the liver and imbalance of Qi(energy) and blood circulation, etc.

Which type of constitution are you for your vertigo?

From traditional Chinese medicine’s perspective, there are six types of constitution in which people tend to get vertigo.

・Liver fire rising

・Liver yang rising

・Qi & blood deficiency

・Kidney essence deficiency

・Damp-phlegm

・Blood stasis

 

Type1 – Liver Fire Rising 

Symptoms:
・High blood pressure
・Headache
・Getting frequent thirst
・Feeling bitter in the mouth
・Irritability
・Yellow urination
・Getting red cheeks
・Bloodshot eyes.

 

Tips for Type 1: 

Have a good sleep habit – Staying up late can make your vertigo worse. It’s highly recommended to sleep before 11 pm to have a good sleep.

Get hydrated – From a traditional Chinese medicine standpoint, it is important to hydrate yourself. You can read our blog post for more detail on drinking water.

Eat green vegetables – In your daily meal, try to include green vegetables such as spinach, kale, green beans, cucumbers, zucchini, lettuce, etc.

Have sour food in your meal – You can eat pickles, vinegar, lemons, and limes, etc.

Refrain from greasy & spicy food – You should avoid eating fried food and food with chili sauce.

Type 1 - Liver Fire Rising for vertigo

Type 2 – Liver Yang Rising 

In traditional Chinese medicine’s point of view, this is the worst version of Type 1. 

Symptoms:
・All symptoms from Type1
・Dry eyes
・Night sweats
・Hot feet, 

 

Tips for Type2:

Refrain from alcohol, greasy food – You should avoid drinking alcohol as well as eating fried and greasy food.

Have more vegetables and fruits in your meal – Recommended foods are radish, celery, tomatoes, watermelon, etc.

Drink green tea instead of coffee 

Type 2 - LiverYang Rising for vertigo

Type3 – Qi &  Blood Deficiency 

A lot of women tend to be this type. If you are doing a crash diet, working excessive hours, staying up late more than, you are more likely to be this type. In terms of traditional Chinese medicine, your digestive organ doesn’t have enough power to bring nutrition to your whole body.

 

Symptoms:
・Low blood pressure
・Vertigo when standing up
・Pale face, lips, and nails
・Loss of appetite
・Sudden heartbeat
・Unstable sleep, abnormal  & heavy period bleeding, 

 

Tips for Type 3:

Have black and red-colored food – Foods like black sesame, kidney beans, carrots, tomatoes, jujubes are recommended.

Have food that helps your digestive organ – beans, mushrooms, pork, yams, potatoes, apples.

Drink jujube tea, black soybean tea

Type 3 - Qi & Blood Deficiency for Vertigo

Type 4 – Kidney Essence Deficiency 

Some people suffer from vertigo because it is congenital. Another cause for this type comes from aging. It is quite difficult even if you change your diet and lifestyle. You can try Chinese herbs as well. You can take our 3 minute-long quiz and get the right Chinse herb.

 

Symptoms:
・Cold hands and feet
・Nervous system disorder
・Eyesight deterioration
・Ringing in the ears
・Tired legs
・Deterioration of memory

 

Tips for type 4:

Eat foods that boost your energy: Foods such as walnuts, black sesame, yams, okra, onions, lamb & mutton, kidney beans are recommended.

Press KD23 acupuncture points – You can massage the points for 2-3 minutes.

Type 4 - Kidney Essence Deficiency

Type 5 – Damp-Phlegm 

Suppose you are this type, you have unnecessary and excessive water in your body. In Chinese medicine, it is very important to remove the extra water.

 

Symptoms:
・Heavy headaches
・pressure on lungs
・Sleepiness during the daytime
・Loss of appetite

 

Tips for Type 5: 

Do exercises regularly – Do exercises preferably ones that get you sweaty. i.e. 30 minutes jogging outside, hitting the gym, doing yoga, etc.

Have foods that have diuretics effect: i.e. corns, lettuces, onions, beef, shrimp.

Type 5 - Damp-Phlegm for vertigo

Type 6 – Blood Stasis 

You may have bad blood circulation in your body, causing vertigo. People with a lack of exercise and depression tend to become this type.

 

Symptoms:
・Vertigo with a headache at night
・Headache in one place

 

Tips for Type 6:

Eat foods and drink tea that make blood circulation flow: garlic, onions, ginger, rose tea, jasmine tea.

Type 6 - Blood Stasis for vertigo

Regardless of any types, here’re some tips

Have a good sleeping habit – Avoid staying up late. Get to sleep before midnight. 

Refrain from alcohol and tobacco – If you drink alcohol and smoke tobacco on a daily basis, you are better off reducing the frequency.

Meditate and rest well – Having stress can make your vertigo worse. Meditation helps to become mindful.

Do regular exercises 2 to 3 times a week – Do light exercises such as walking outside for 30 minutes, jogging for 15 mins, doing yoga, etc. 

Type 6 - Blood Stasis for vertigo

Not getting any improvements after trying these tips?

If you try these remedies and don’t see any improvements, you might want to consider trying natural Chinese herbs.

You can take our 3 minutes-long quiz to get the effective Chinese herb for you.

 

Please feel welcome to comment if you have any questions about this post.

Sayonara till next post.

 

About Author: Satoru Ozawa – Doctor of Oriental Medicine, an acupuncturist, and a Chinese herb specialist. 

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